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Posts Tagged ‘openttd’

OpenTTD Game Diary #3 – Collecting the Iron

2011-04-19 by Macha. 0 comments

While my Iron line is making a profit since the last entry, it’s not really carrying that many goods. The bottleneck is the lack of Iron being brought to the Steel Mill. While I could resolve this by just waiting for the Iron Mine I’m using to expand, I have a few other Iron Mines on the map that I could make use of. But before I can connect it up, I’ll need to replace that quick and easy drop off I used for the Steel Mill drop station. (A side note: The names of towns, like Fairypool, are created using the Silly language pack – the default is for more serious names if you don’t like them. Station names are based on nearby towns, but the player can rename them)

The old Steel Mill drop station - totally uninteresting

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OpenTTD Game Diary #2 – Getting the Goods

2011-04-13 by Macha. 0 comments

Towns in OpenTTD take a few things to grow. The first is frequent, regular passenger transport. This will enable you to grow your first towns slowly, but it’s not enough for fast growth. The next thing they need is Goods. Goods represent the culmination of most of the other good chains in the default temperate maps – the two most notable exceptions being passengers, who just go from point to point, and coal, which while profitable, does not lead to any ultimate product.

Of my two towns so far, Sleepywig is the most in need of growth, but the town authority hates me, so I can’t do the necessary landscaping either to add in an additional entrance to the existing station, or build a new station to accept goods. I buy up the land for future use so the city doesn’t expand onto it, and instead focus on bringing goods to Kipperwood.

The obvious option would be to connect the farm and factory nearby to produce goods, but the short distances involved mean the service wouldn’t be very profitable. Instead I connect up an Iron Ore mine to a Steel Mill further away as the start of my industrial efforts. Again I go for some less than ideal station entrances for simpler placement. For trains, this time I go with the Floss ’47′ and 5 Iron Ore carriages. For economic reasons, I have again chosen to go with a Diesel train.

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OpenTTD Game Diary #1 – the first passenger service

2011-04-06 by Macha. 0 comments

To follow up to my previous OpenTTD post, I am going to do a game diary of the first 10 or so years of a transport company in game. The game difficulty is a custom difficulty, equivalent to Medium with AIs turned off and breakdowns reduced.  I’m ok at this game – I’m no pro player, but on the other hand hanging around openttdcoop has helped me in a lot of places. My map settings are as shown below:

Map Settings are fairly boring

I am starting in 1980 rather than the default, earlier starting date as the default starting date leaves you with just steam engines which makes starting off that much slower.

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OpenTTD – The Gamer’s Train Set

2011-04-04 by Macha. 3 comments

It’s a sad fact that there are few successful open source games. The fact that Battle for Wesnoth continually gets pulled up as an example of a good open source game is proof of that. Not that there is anything wrong with it, but it’s certainly no instant classic. However, luckily for OpenTTD, there are a couple of exceptions.

The basics of OpenTTD are the same as with every Tycoon game – you start up a business, build it up, make money, build it up some more, and repeat. However, after a while, your company is sufficiently successful enough that you will never have to worry about money again. It is at this point that most tycoon games become boring, and you either start a new game, or stop playing. However, with OpenTTD, the business aspect is a rather small part of the game. The main focus quickly switches to the network: How can I transport more passengers? How can I get more trains through this hub? How can I optimise this junction? These are the type of matters I personally focus on most during gameplay.

There are also many more ways to play than just connecting up more places to your network in single player. Some players focus on making picturesque realistic railroads while others combine together to make super-efficient behemoths capable of transporting absurd amounts of goods and passengers each month, bringing with it equally absurd profits.

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